Cross the bridge when you come to it

Worrying Makes You Cross the bridge Before You Come To It

 The ultimate origin of this proverb, a caution not to anticipate trouble and often put as don’t cross a bridge till you come to it, has been lost. The earliest recorded use is in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s The Golden Legend (1851): “Don’t cross the bridge till you come to it, is a proverb old and of excellent wit.”

Meaning: Don’t fret unnecessarily about future problems. Do not concern yourself with difficulties until they arise. Try to solve a problem before it becomes a problem

Explanation: Used when speaking about someone who needlessly creates problems that might not even exist in the future.

cross a bridge when one comes to it

cross that bridge when you come to it

don’t cross a bridge till you come to it

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